Emerging Contaminants Summit
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Emerging Contaminants Summit
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Bharat Chandramouli Bharat Chandramouli
Environmental Scientist
SGS AXYS

Dr Bharat Chandramouli is an environmental scientist and analytical chemist with more than 15 years of experience in the science, quality control and other aspects of ultra-trace analysis of persistent organic contaminants and contaminants of emerging concern. He is a co-author on books and peer-reviewed journals relating to PFAS and pharmaceuticals and personal care products occurrence, the effects of filtration on PFAS analysis, metabolomics, and other topics. SGS AXYS provides accredited ultra-trace analysis for a large variety of legacy persistent organic pollutants and emerging and pre-regulatory contaminants of concern using gas chromatography-high/low resolution mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.



FLASH POSTER PRESENTATION

Distribution of Bisphenol A (BPA) and 5 BPA Analogues in the Solid and Liquid Waste Streams of a Secondary Wastewater Treatment System

The decision by various regulators to phase out certain uses of bisphenol A (BPA) has led to its gradual replacement with an increasing number of bisphenols. A number of these bisphenols are being detected in different components of the environment. Given that these bisphenols are often analogues of bisphenol A with small structural modifications, they also show estrogenic activity and some are more potent estrogens than BPA. In this study, a method for quantitative determination of BPA and five BPA analogues (BPB, BPE, BPF, BPS, and BPAF) was developed and applied for influent/effluent and biosolid samples from a secondary wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Canada. BPA and all five BPA analogues were detected in at least one of the three matrices studied. BPA and Bisphenol S (BPS) were detected in all the samples analyzed. BPE was mainly detected in effluent samples, whereas Bisphenol AF (BPAF) was predominantly detected in biosolid samples. Bisphenol F was detected in influent and effluent matrices but was not detected in biosolid samples. The highest concentration of bisphenol in the aqueous waste stream was detected for BPS (852 ng/L), followed by BPA (560 ng/L), BPE (365 ng/L), BPF (100 ng/L), BPB (4.3 ng/L). In the solid waste stream, the highest concentration was detected for BPA (3,977 ng/g, BPS (328 ng/g) BPAF (167 ng/g). BPB, BPE, and BPF were not detected in the solid waste stream. The effect of sample storage on data quality will also be discussed in relation to the biodegradation of these analytes in WWTP samples.


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