Emerging Contaminants Summit
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Emerging Contaminants Summit
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Lea Kane Lea Kane
Senior Geologist
Geosyntec Consultants

Lea Kane is a Senior Geologist for Geosyntec Consultants in Oakland, California. She has spent the last 12 years working as an environmental consultant, characterizing and remediating soil and groundwater at contaminated sites. Her experience has spanned a variety of projects, including remedial program management for a large chlorinated solvent Superfund site in the San Francisco Bay Area, development of advanced site investigation approaches to delineate complex contaminant plumes, and the application of innovative in situ abiotic and biological remediation technologies for treatment of soil and groundwater. In recent years, she has supported research and demonstration efforts related to the application of in situ chemical reduction technologies for the treatment of the emerging contaminant 1,2,3-trichloropropane. She is a licensed Professional Geologist in the State of California.



PLATFORM PRESENTATION

Verification Monitoring for In Situ Chemical Reduction Using Zero-Valent Zinc, A Novel Technology for Remediation of 1,2,3-TCP

The reactivity profile of highly halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons such as tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene is widely understood and informs remedy selection for these compounds in groundwater. In contrast, the reactivity profile of “lesser chlorinated” aliphatic hydrocarbons such as 1,2-dichloroethane is understood less well and not systematically considered when developing remedial approaches for these compounds. One lesser chlorinated hydrocarbon, 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP), was identified as number three in a list of primary emerging contaminants at a recent SERDP/ESTCP workshop on long-term management of contaminated sites. The workshop characterized potential TCP impacts at DoD facilities by stating that “while 1,2,3-TCP is not a contaminant of concern at a large number of DoD sites, the intensity of contamination at a small number of sites is of significant concern.” To date, TCP has been observed at more than 45 installations. The median detected concentrations (approximately 1 µg/L) have been low, but are nonetheless high relative to regulatory levels for TCP.

TCP is mobile in the subsurface and resistant to natural attenuation. Compared to more halogenated compounds, TCP is less likely to sorb to solid material or partition into the vapor phase. Remediation options for TCP are limited, particularly at current and anticipated future regulatory levels. One treatment process that produces promising rates of TCP degradation is in situ chemical reduction (ISCR) with zero-valent zinc (ZVZ). This presentation summarizes results from previously completed ZVZ injections and follow-on monitoring designed to collect data to demonstrate and validate the use of ZVZ to promote abiotic ISCR of TCP in groundwater.


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