Emerging Contaminants Summit
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Emerging Contaminants Summit
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Rob Singer Rob Singer
Principal Project Manager
Wood

Mr. Singer has a B.S. in Civil Engineering from University of Delaware and has been practicing environmental engineering for over 25 years. He has been actively engaged in PFAS investigation and mitigation since 2013. Since 2014, he has been the principal consultant supporting the US Air Force with their PFOS/PFOA response at the former Pease AFB. Mr. Singer is currently managing the design, construction, and optimization of two groundwater treatment plants at Pease as well as a base-wide expanded Site Inspection program.



POSTER PRESENTATION

Deploying a “Three-Legged-Stool” Approach to Drinking Water Protection for PFAS Mitigation

Three-legged stools are necessary to provide reliable stability and balance. Over the past six years since discovery of PFAS in drinking water supplies at Pease, the Air Force has worked with multiple stakeholders to develop and deployed a “three-legged stool” approach to protecting drinking water and managing migration of PFAS-impacted groundwater at Pease. The three legs of the stool include (1) a groundwater extraction and treatment system (GWETS) to manage groundwater migration from the former fire training area (source area), (2) a second GWETS to intercept groundwater flow from the source area towards three public water supply wells, and (3) a municipal drinking water treatment plant to remove PFAS from the drinking water before distribution. PFAS removal is being conducted using three different treatment technologies. The GWETS at the fire training area, which was commissioned in April 2018, uses granular activated carbon (GAC) followed by a first-of-its-kind regenerable ion exchange resin for PFAS removal. The second GWETS, which was commissioned in April 2019 and is referred to as the Airfield Interim Mitigation System (AIMS), uses GAC followed by Dow Chemical’s PSR2+ single-use ion exchange resin. The municipal drinking water treatment plant, which is under construction and will be commissioned in 2020, uses ECT’s LC1 single-use resin followed by GAC. The GWETS at the fire training area uses a state-of-the-art IX resin regeneration system that has demonstrated the ability to restore the resin removal capacity and concentrate the PFAS waste down to a volume of less than 10 cubic feet of media for over 20 million gallons treated. Although pump-and-treat remains the most effective means of consistently removing PFAS from water, the regenerable IX resin solution has proven to be a sustainable alternative that minimizes the liability and environmental concerns associated with waste generation and off-site disposal. By the end of 2019, the two GWETS’ will have treated more than 125 million gallons of groundwater to PFAS levels below the EPA’s Lifetime HA and the NHDES’ Ambient Groundwater Quality Standards, and have consistently discharged treated with no PFOS or PFOA detected. The presentation will provide a history of the project development; discuss the technology selection process for the three plants; describe the design, installation, and integration of the three systems; and present operation, optimization, and performance data collected to date for the two GWETS that are in operation.


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