Emerging Contaminants Summit
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Emerging Contaminants Summit
Register Today!



Scott Wilson Scott Wilson
President, CEO
REGENESIS

Mr. Wilson has extensive experience in the development and application of advanced technologies for groundwater and soil restoration. He is a widely published expert with over 30 years’ experience designing, installing and operating a broad range of remediation technologies. Mr. Wilson has expertise in project management and has directed the successful completion of large industrial remediation programs under State and Federal regulatory frameworks. At REGENESIS, on specific projects, he plays an active role in technical oversight and program management to ensure conformance with customer expectations.



WORKSHOP PRESENTATION

Colloidal Activated Carbon Applied in Pilot Study as an in-situ Treatment Reduces PFAS and PCE Below Target Levels in Groundwater at a Michigan Army National Guard Site

In 2016, the Michigan Department of Military and Veteran Affairs (DMVA) became aware of the potential contamination of PFAS at Camp Grayling in Crawford County, Michigan from historical operations such as firefighting training and began testing. PFAS was found at levels above the USEPA drinking water advisory limit of 70 ng/L, commingled with a chlorinated solvent plume that was migrating towards the property boundary. The DMVA reviewed potential remedial options such as pump and treat, but ultimately decided to test an in-situ reactive barrier application of colloidal activated carbon. Colloidal activated carbon was selected because of the expected rapid reductions of PFAS by removal from the dissolved mobile phase. Colloidal activated carbon effectively increases the retardation factor of PFAS migration contaminants by multiple orders of magnitude and eliminates the exposure to down-gradient receptors. In addition, colloidal activated carbon was selected due to its expected lower total project costs when compared to operating a mechanical system over a similar time. This presentation will review the project design considerations, field activities, and long-term post- application data. The project area was treated with a single application of colloidal activated carbon to address PFAS and chlorinated impacts in groundwater. The remediation solution was applied under low pressure (non-fracking) conditions using direct-push technology with separate soil cores and monitoring well gauging to determine distribution. Five rounds of post-application monitoring show that PlumeStop has reduced PFAS and PCE to below target levels in each of the downgradient wells. The mass flux and predictive competitive sorption modeling demonstrated a theoretical PFAS retardation span of greater than 50 years. Results from the field activities demonstrate distribution of the colloidal activated carbon has been achieved using low pressure injection methods. This study indicates that an in-situ application of colloidal activated carbon is a viable low-cost alternative to the established remediation method of a high-cost pump and treat system to address the risk associated with PFAS contamination at the site.


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