Emerging Contaminants Summit
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Emerging Contaminants Summit
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yida fang Yida Fang
PhD Student
Colorado School of Mines

Originally desired to design civil infrastructures and bridges, Yida started his academic career in civil engineering at Montana State University. After earning his bachelor’s degree and two years of work at Western Transpiration Institute (WTI) as an undergraduate researcher, Yida confirmed his interests in environmental research and obtained his master’s degree in environmental engineering from UIUC. He is currently a graduate student in Dr. Strathmann’s group, where his research involves the study of fate of contaminants of emerging concerns (CECs). Outside of lab, Yida enjoys exploring the beautiful Colorado through skiing and mountain biking.



STUDENT PRESENTATION

Removal of Poly- and Perfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in Aqueous Film-Forming Foam (AFFF) Impacted Water Using Ion Exchange and Non-Ionic Resins

Detection of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in aquatic systems have increased in recent years due to their widespread use in aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) used in firefighting. While anion exchange resins (AER) have proven to be a promising technology for adsorbing some of the major PFAS, such as the long chain perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) PFOA and PFOS, their ability for removing short chain PFAAs and other PFASs in AFFF remains unknown. In this study, a combination of non-selective and PFAS-selective AER, cation exchange resins (CER), and non-ionic resins (NIR) were examined to adsorb a wide range of PFAS, including PFAAs and a large number of structures identified by LC-QToF-MS in complex AFFF mixtures. Result shows the PFAA affinity is dependent upon PFAS identity and characteristics (ionic headgroup, chain length, prevailing charge), resin properties, equilibration time, and PFAS-to-resin loading ration. While historically NIR and CER have granted little attention for PFAS removal, this study reveals superior ability for adsorbing selected PFAA precursors. Strategies for optimal treatment of the full diversity of PFAS in AFFF-impacted waters will be discussed.


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